About Ceres Agri-tech

Our Story

Founded in 2018, Ceres funds commercially relevant agri-tech projects from our university partners and provides commercial expertise to accelerate them to market. Ceres is supported by a £4.8m grant from Research England’s Connecting Capability Fund, which drives collaboration among UK universities and supports commercialisation of their research through partnerships with industry.

As the pipeline of high-quality agri-tech innovation continues to grow, Ceres is now beginning the transition from grant-led funding to a long-term, investment-based evergreen fund.

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Our Partners

Our Partners

The University of Cambridge (UoC) is ranked in the UK’s top two universities and in the top three worldwide by the Times Higher Education 2020 Rankings. It draws on a long tradition of research excellence, spanning over 11 departments from Plant Sciences to Engineering, with key strengths in big data, biotechnology, and computing.

UoC supports interdisciplinary agricultural research through strategic research initiatives, such as Global Food Security and the CamBridgeSens network for sensor research, and forges close links with the UK’s leading institutes for agri-tech R&D. These include NIAB (via the Crop Science Centre) and the John Innes Centre and Earlham Institute (via the OpenPlant Synthetic Biology Research Centre). It has also collaborated with partner universities across England to help set up AgriFoRwArdS, the world’s first doctoral training centre in agri-food robotics, established at the University of Lincoln in conjunction with the University of East Anglia.

UoC is supported by the extensive commercialisation expertise and industrial networks of Cambridge Enterprise, its technology transfer arm, to connect Ceres academic partners with commercial opportunities in the East of England and beyond.

https://www.cam.ac.uk

The University of East Anglia (UEA) is ranked by The Times in 2020 as one of the top 200 universities in the world and top 25 in the UK, as well as 10th in the country for the quality of its research.

UEA’s agri-food expertise spans multiple schools within the University, including Biological Sciences, Chemistry, Computing and Environmental Science, and is supported by the outstanding commercial know-how of Norwich Business School. This has helped to build the University’s track record of successful industry collaboration with large multi-national companies, start-ups, and SMEs.

UEA also has strong collaborative links with internationally renowned research institutes in the region. The John Innes Centre and Sainsbury Laboratory lead the world in plant and microbial sciences, while the Quadram Institute has complementary strengths in food science and technology.

Interdisciplinary research programmes across UEA underpin the University’s innovation in agri-food. The Internet of Food Things Network Plus project brings together data scientists, chemists, and economists, ultimately to help shape digitisation of the future UK food supply chain. The Food for Thought Network connects over 200 companies, providing expert advice to agri-food businesses in the East of England, while the AgriFoRwArdS Agri-Food Robotics centre for doctoral training brings together the resources of the University of Cambridge, UEA and the University of Lincoln to teach the next generation of experts in this field.

http://uea.ac.uk

Image © UEA 2020. External view of the Enterprise Centre.

The University of Hertfordshire (UoH) is one of the UK’s top business-facing universities, leading in academia-small business collaboration across the country.

Its research impact has been influential in steering European agricultural and environmental policy, through the work of the Agriculture and Environment Research Unit (AERU) on the UoH Pesticides Properties Database. UoH takes an interdisciplinary approach to solving problems in agri-tech, advancing the state of the art in a wide range of areas from climate change modelling to detecting crop risk.

UoH is an integral part of multiple initiatives to enhance agricultural innovation. With Rothamsted Research, Cranfield University and UCL, UoH is a delivery partner of the £3.5m Société Generale UK Foundation-backed SHAKE Climate Change programme to support start-ups. UoH has partnered with the Royal Veterinary College, Rothamsted Research, and Oaklands College to set up the Centre for Agriculture, Food and Environmental Management (CAFEM), which delivers collaborative research and education in agricultural, agritech, and agri-environmental sciences.

UoH also runs the pioneering Hertfordshire Knowledge Exchange Partnership (HKEP) scheme, which has been commended by HEFCE as outstanding.

https://www.herts.ac.uk

The University of Lincoln (UoL) is ranked in the Top 200 globally for Agriculture and Forestry in the QS World University Rankings 2019. It is home to the outstanding Lincoln Institute for Agri-Food Technology (LIAT), which supports and enhances productivity, efficiency and sustainability in food and farming through research, education and technology.

LIAT’s researchers are engaged in the development of technologies which solve challenges across the food chain, ‘from farm to fork’, collaborating with partners in industry, academia and their colleagues at the National Centre for Food Manufacturing in Holbeach, South Lincolnshire. Their work will deliver the world-class research and higher-level skills the UK’s agri-food industries need today and in the future.

UoL was recently awarded EPSRC funding to lead on the establishment of AgriFoRwArdS, in collaboration with the Universities of Cambridge and East Anglia. This is the world’s first Centre for Doctoral Training for Agri-Food Robotics, and is creating the largest ever cohort of Robotics and Autonomous Systems (RAS) specialists for the global food and farming sectors.

https://www.lincoln.ac.uk

The University of Reading (UoR) is one of the UK’s top 40 universities. It has world-class expertise along the entire agri-food value chain, from sustainable land management and crops through to food science.

UoR oversees key agricultural resources, including international initiatives such as the International Cocoa Quarantine Centre, and national facilities and resources and facilities. The latter include the Brogdale National Fruit Collection, a UK-wide horticultural resource, and the Field Crop Research Unit at Sonning Farm, which spans 12 ha and has capacity for arable crop research from plot to field scale.

UoR’s strengths in food technology are supported by the University’s Centres for Food Processing, Sensory Science, and Flavour. The Food Processing Centre is one of the largest facilities of its kind across Europe, with a fully functional pilot processing line and £4 million worth of plant equipment, and can oversee projects all the way from concept to pilot-scale manufacturing.

Agri-tech research across the University has a strong multidisciplinary focus, ranging from precision agriculture and the use of on-farm sensors in crop management to the use of big data to improve efficiency in the food value chain. On a larger scale, UoR also has leading experts on agri-tech adoption, knowledge exchange, and the ethics of new agricultural technologies.

http://www.reading.ac.uk

The NIAB Group is the UK’s fastest growing crop science organisation, having trebled in size over the past decade through a strategic programme of investment, merger and acquisition. Founded in 1919, and with a longstanding international reputation for expertise in plant varieties and seeds, today NIAB’s scientific capabilities span the crop improvement pipeline.  NIAB is at the forefront of the application of genetics, physiology, soil science, precision agronomy and data science to improve the yield, efficiency and resilience of crop production across  the arable and horticulture sectors.

NIAB has recently undergone a major programme of building and refurbishment at its Cambridge site with new offices and laboratories that provide cutting edge facilities.  As a part of this building programme NIAB has joined with Cambridge University to build the Crop Science Centre.  NIAB collaborates with a wide range of academic institutions, research organisations and commercial partners.

NIAB has an active programme of working with agritech start-ups and SMEs.  NIAB aims to support companies with innovative technologies in their development through collaborative projects and trials.  In early 2021 NIAB will be opening “Barn 4” a brand new agritech incubator which will add additional routes for NIAB to develop these relationships.

https://www.niab.com

Rothamsted Research is a world-leading research institute that focuses on strategic agricultural science to the benefit of farmers and society worldwide. Its research is funded primarily by the UK Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council, but through a range of funding sources the institute collaborates with industry and academic organisations in over 50 countries delivering impact in the UK as well as internationally.

Rothamsted Research has a portfolio of innovation programmes and accelerators available to UK businesses and growers. It is also a founding member of Agrimetrics, the Centre of Innovation Excellence in Livestock and the Centre for Crop Health and Protection.

Through Rothamsted Enterprises, a joint venture between Rothamsted Research, BBSRC and the Lawes Agricultural Trust, the institute provides incubation services to start-ups and small and medium-sized companies which require access to cutting-edge scientific facilities and services.

https://www.rothamsted.ac.uk

The John Innes Centre (JIC) is a world leading research centre specializing in plant and microbial science, with established partnerships with regional plant breeders, agronomists and the agrochemical industry. It has an established knowledge exchange (KE) infrastructure that was recognised with the BBSRC Excellence with Impact Award in 2016 for its innovative approach to knowledge exchange, translation and commercialisation. JIC has established six agri-tech spinout companies since 2014.

https://www.jic.ac.uk

The Ceres Agri-Tech Knowledge Exchange Partnership is funded as part of an investment through Research England’s Connecting Capability Fund in new collaborative projects to drive forward world-class university commercialisation across the country. The Connecting Capability Fund supports universities in working together, and with businesses and other partners, to commercialise research and share good practice and capacity. The Fund is highlighted in the Government’s Industrial Strategy and will help achieve its aims of enhancing UK industrial competitiveness and productivity. 

Visit this link to find out more:
https://re.ukri.org/funding/our-funds-overview/the-connecting-capability-fund-ccf/

Our People

The Ceres project is run by four collaborating teams, responsible for day-to day project management, decisions on translational funding awards, and overall governance.

The Ceres Team works closely with researchers and Portfolio Co-ordinators across all our partner universities to develop projects for pitching to the Investment Committee. When projects win Ceres funding, the Ceres Team continues to support and manage them, and reports on their progress to the Investment Committee. The Ceres Team also convenes the Management Committee and Investment Committee, liaising with both to develop the Ceres project as a whole.

Louise Sutherland

Director

Louise Sutherland

Director

Louise joined Ceres as Director in June 2019. Her extensive agri-tech credentials include chairing the Raspberry Breeding Consortium (a joint research and industry partnership) at James Hutton Ltd., as well as previously chairing both the AHDB Soft Fruit Panel and the Red Tractor Fresh Produce Scheme. Louise has also been a member of the AHDB Horticulture Board and the Assured Food Standards Board.

She has over a decade’s experience working at Marks & Spencer, holding a variety of technical and commercial roles across their food business. Louise has a PhD in Plant Pathology from the University of Reading and worked on novel biocontrol systems for tree diseases during her time as a researcher at the Forestry Commission.

Contact: info@CeresAgritech.org 

Geoff Elliott

Project Development Manager

Geoff Elliott

Project Development Manager

Geoff became the Ceres Project Development Manager in April 2019. As a senior member of Cambridge Enterprise’s Technology Transfer team, Geoff was heavily involved in the initial funding bid for Ceres and co-ordinated the set-up of the Ceres project. He has extensive experience in research management and commercialisation within academia and industry, both in the UK and USA.

He has worked as an independent research consultant within commercial genetic test development, as a Senior Molecular Microbiologist at the James Hutton Institute, and as a post-doctoral research fellow in a wide range of areas including agricultural, industrial and environmental microbial profiling, mitochondrial identification, bacterial resistance and epidemiology, as well as in the evolution of nitrogen fixation symbioses in Central and South America. Geoff holds a PhD in Microbial Genetics from the University of Liverpool, and in 2015 also attained a Graduate Diploma in Law.

Contact: info@CeresAgritech.org 

Matt Bilyard

Ceres Associate

Matt Bilyard

Ceres Associate

Matt joined the Ceres Team as a commercialisation associate in June 2020. He has gained experience in technology development working as an innovation consultant at Innovia Technology, where he was involved in the design and delivery of front-end innovation projects for clients across a range of industry sectors, including food.

He was a post-doctoral research fellow at the University of Cambridge, working at the interface between chemistry and biology as part of multiple inter-departmental collaborations. Matt holds a PhD in Organic Chemistry from the University of Oxford, which focused on methods to modify and study sugar-processing enzymes, and an MSci in Natural Sciences from the University of Cambridge.

The Investment Committee is responsible for all project funding decisions. The Investment Committee determines whether or not to award initial funds when projects are pitched, and assess milestone achievement during the lifetime of funded projects.

Jim Godfrey

O.B.E. (Chair)

Jim Godfrey

O.B.E. (Chair)

Jim is a director of RJ and AE Godfrey, a family farming business in Lincolnshire. Jim is the President of the Royal Agricultural Society of England and currently chairs the National Institute of Agricultural Botany (NIAB).

He is also Chairman of the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI), a member of the UK Government’s Agri-Food Technology Council, a steering group member of the Commercial Farmers Group, a director of the Lincolnshire Rural Support Network (LRSN), and a member of Lincoln University Industry Agri-Food Technology Group.

Jim was awarded the OBE for services to Scottish agricultural research in 2002, and in 2015 received the RASE National Agricultural Award. He is a Fellow of the Institute of Directors.

Mark Suthern

Mark Suthern

Mark is the Managing Director and National Head of Agriculture for Barclays Bank. He leads a team of 200 UK colleagues, focusing entirely on farming, agri-tech, energy and environment, and landed estates. Mark joined Barclays in 1986, having worked for a short time in industry after graduating from Sheffield Hallam University.

Mark is an Associate of the Chartered Institute of Bankers and a Fellow of the Institute of Sales Marketing and Management. He is also a member of the Lincolnshire Agricultural Society, the Farmers Club, and the Council at the Institute of Agricultural Management. Mark is the Chair of Trustees for the Farming Community Network and an External Advisor with N8 Agri-Tech, an interdisciplinary research partnership.

Mark spent 3 months in India on a secondment from Barclay’s, where he worked with the charity VSO on enterprise-based development. He also volunteers as a mentor for the Lord Henry Plumb Foundation.

Richard Williamson

Richard Williamson

Richard is the Managing Director of Beeswax Dyson Farming Ltd, the largest owner and operator of land in the UK. Its core areas are farming, property, and energy production, with a strong focus on using technology to deliver sustainable systems. The business supports innovation in farming through a broad range of field trials and collaborations with suppliers, manufacturers, and researchers.

Richard began his career in large-scale farming at Velcourt, after graduating from the Royal Agricultural College with the McClellan Medal. In 1994, he was appointed to the board of Velcourt as Farms Director, where he was responsible for all farm and estate management, commercial, and development decisions within the region.

Sarah Blanford

Sarah Blanford

Sarah is the Crop, Organic and Agriculture Data Manager for Sainsbury’s Supermarkets. Her team of Agronomists and sourcing experts look after all crop-related areas throughout the supply chain, using data to drive insights and unlock value.

Prior to this, Sarah spent over 10 years working at Sainsbury’s across a number of Produce categories, including three years leading the Vegetables, Salads and Prepared Technical team.

Before joining Sainsbury’s, Sarah worked within the supply base, looking after a number of retail accounts from a technical standpoint. Sarah has had the opportunity to travel extensively throughout her career, which has allowed her to build on her passion for food and farming.

Vivek Dogra

Vivek Dogra

Vivek is the Head of Incubation and Venturing for Corporate R&D at Nestlé. He first joined the company in 2007 at its Headquarters in Switzerland, within its Innovation Acceleration Team, where he led cross-functional groups and deployed several priority multi-market innovation projects across various Nestlé business areas.

In 2010, Vivek joined Nestlé’s Corporate Research & Development Innovation Partnerships & Licensing team, establishing several strong innovation. He was transferred to Singapore in 2013, where he successfully developed a strategic partnership with the Singapore Government’s A*STAR (Agency for Science, Technology & Research). This led to the set-up of Nestlé Research Center Asia within Singapore’s biotech park, Biopolos. In 2016, Vivek returned to Switzerland to take up his current role.

Before joining Nestle, Vivek held multiple regional P&L roles in the Asia-Pacific, based in Singapore, with leading multinationals including Diageo, Red Bull & Heineken. Vivek has an MBA from INSEAD France.

David Lawrence

David Lawrence

David is the Chair of the UK Knowledge Transfer Network Ltd and Agrimetrics Ltd. He is also Deputy Chair of the Science Advisory Board of the Nottingham Synthetic Biology Centre, a Director of the UK Innovation & Science Seed Fund and Tropic Biosciences, and a Trustee of the John Innes Foundation. He is a member of both the UK Industrial Biotechnology Leadership Forum and the Nuffield Council for Bioethics. In addition, he consults for a number of early stage start-up companies.

David is a former Non-Executive Director at Syngenta. Prior to that, he was Syngenta’s Head of Research & Development from 2002 to 2009. During his time at Syngenta, he was a member of the investment panel for the joint venture fund established with Life Science Partners, and was instrumental in the creation of Syngenta Ventures. Before joining Syngenta, David held a variety of scientific and management roles in ICI and Zeneca.

Iain Thomas

Iain Thomas

Iain is the Head of the Life Sciences Technology Transfer team at Cambridge Enterprise. The team commercialises technology in a wide variety of fields, from agri-tech to therapeutics. Recent spin-outs from the University of Cambridge (UoC) include Mission Therapeutics, Cambridge Epigenetix, XO1 Therapeutics, Z-factor, Phoremost and Predictimmune.  XO1 was sold to Janssen for an undisclosed sum.

Iain has led discussions with GSK on the UoC–GSK open innovation drug discovery initiative, based at the Stevenage Bioscience Catalyst. He helped co-found Apollo Therapeutics, an innovative vehicle for developing early stage therapeutic opportunities from UoC, University College London and Imperial College, and led the creation of the Ceres Agri-Tech Knowledge Exchange Partnership. Iain is also a member of the Ceres Management Committee.

Elizabeth Robinson

Elizabeth Robinson

Elizabeth is Professor of Environmental Economics at the University of Reading. She has over 25 years’ experience working in lower-income countries, including six spent living in Tanzania and Ghana. Her work has included addressing the design of policies and institutions to enhance agricultural systems, to protect the environment, and to improve the livelihoods of resource-dependent communities.

Her recent research focuses on the co-benefits of climate change mitigation and health (particularly for food security and food systems) and the social, environmental, and ecological trade-offs of agricultural expansion.

Elizabeth holds a first-class degree in Engineering, Economics, and Management from the University of Oxford, and a PhD in Applied Economics from Stanford University. Before joining the University of Reading, she worked at the Boston Consulting Group, the World Bank, Natural Resources Institute, as a tutorial fellow in economics at the University of Oxford. She also served on the DEFRA Economic Advisory Panel for five years.

Phil Fiddaman

Phil Fiddaman

Phil is the Deputy Director of Business Development at the University of Hertfordshire (UoH). His knowledge exchange team supports businesses in accessing University academic expertise. They have an outstanding track record of securing Innovate UK funding with business partners, especially in Knowledge Transfer Partnerships.

Phil is a steering committee member at the Agritech Research Innovation Accelerator (AgRIA) programme, which is led by Rothamsted Research. He is a board member of the Green Triangle, a collaboration between UoH, Rothamsted Research, Building Research Establishment, Oaklands College and St Albans District Council.  Phil has also served on the Hertfordshire LEP Enterprise & Innovation programme board.

Phil holds a BSc in Agricultural Sciences and a PhD in Plant Pathology from the University of Nottingham. He worked as a post-doctoral researcher and then worked at the biotech SME MicroBio Ltd before joining UoH in 2004.

Jon Carter

Jon Carter

Jon is the Head of Innovation, Research and Innovation Services at the University of East Anglia (UEA). He has over 15 years’ experience working at the interface between academic research and commercial activity.

In his current role, Jon is responsible for intellectual property management, consultancy, and external business relationship management for UEA. He is involved in a number of translational and early stage funds including the Norwich Research Park Translational Fund, the Iceni Fund, and the Low Carbon Innovation Fund. He has also been a board member of a number of start-up companies.

Before working in knowledge exchange, Jon had a research career in applied microbiology. He now works on projects ranging from creative writing publishing to the exploitation of advances in organic chemistry. Jon is also a member of the Ceres Management Committee.

Andrew Stevenson

Andrew Stevenson

Andrew is the Director of Research and Enterprise at the University of Lincoln (UoL), where he works to establish strong links between academia and industry. He has played a leading role in establishing the Lincoln Science & Innovation Park and the Lincoln Growth Fund (supported by the Regional Growth Fund), together with a range of ‘access to finance’ initiatives for regional companies.

Andrew is currently a Director and Chair of the East Midlands Incubation Network, a Director of Investors in Lincoln, the University spin-out company Metnano Limited and the Midlands Engine Innovation Group. He provides a key link to the Greater Lincolnshire Local Enterprise Partnership, and has led for UoL on the establishment of the Midlands Enterprise Universities Group. Andrew is also a member of the Ceres Management Committee.

The Management Committee oversees the governance and operational aspects of the Ceres project. The team manages the project finances, communicates with all Ceres university partners and external stakeholders, and oversees the project’s formal progress reviews.

Iain Thomas

Iain Thomas

Iain is the Head of the Life Sciences Technology Transfer team at Cambridge Enterprise. The team commercialises technology in a wide variety of fields, from agri-tech to therapeutics. Recent spin-outs from the University of Cambridge (UoC) include Mission Therapeutics, Cambridge Epigenetix, XO1 Therapeutics, Z-factor, Phoremost and Predictimmune.  XO1 was sold to Janssen for an undisclosed sum.

Iain has led discussions with GSK on the UoC–GSK open innovation drug discovery initiative, based at the Stevenage Bioscience Catalyst. He helped co-found Apollo Therapeutics, an innovative vehicle for developing early stage therapeutic opportunities from UoC, University College London and Imperial College, and led the creation of the Ceres Agri-Tech Knowledge Exchange Partnership. Iain is also a member of the Ceres Management Committee.

Susan Matos

Susan Matos

Susan is the Director of the University of Reading’s (UoR’s) Knowledge Transfer Centre. She leads a team that supports and facilitates collaborations between university researchers and external partners, particularly SMEs. By providing tailored, high-level support throughout the entire process, Susan and her team boost innovation, enable projects to secure funding, and help companies to increase their competitiveness.

In addition to managing the Knowledge Transfer Centre and its team, Susan also directly scopes and supports a number of projects within UoR’s Knowledge Transfer Partnership programme (KTP). The KTP is a government-funded scheme that encourages companies, charities, and academic teams to work together on mutually beneficial projects. UoR’s KTP office is one of the most successful in the UK, running projects across multiple academic schools within the University. These projects deliver real benefits, often by enabling knowledge transfer through the employment of highly skilled University graduates.

Jon Carter

Jon Carter

Jon is the Head of Innovation, Research and Innovation Services at the University of East Anglia (UEA). He has over 15 years’ experience working at the interface between academic research and commercial activity.

In his current role, Jon is responsible for intellectual property management, consultancy, and external business relationship management for UEA. He is involved in a number of translational and early stage funds including the Norwich Research Park Translational Fund, the Iceni Fund, and the Low Carbon Innovation Fund. He has also been a board member of a number of start-up companies.

Before working in knowledge exchange, Jon had a research career in applied microbiology. He now works on projects ranging from creative writing publishing to the exploitation of advances in organic chemistry. Jon is also a member of the Ceres Management Committee.

Andrew Stevenson

Andrew Stevenson

Andrew is the Director of Research and Enterprise at the University of Lincoln (UoL), where he works to establish strong links between academia and industry. He has played a leading role in establishing the Lincoln Science & Innovation Park and the Lincoln Growth Fund (supported by the Regional Growth Fund), together with a range of ‘access to finance’ initiatives for regional companies.

Andrew is currently a Director and Chair of the East Midlands Incubation Network, a Director of Investors in Lincoln, the University spin-out company Metnano Limited and the Midlands Engine Innovation Group. He provides a key link to the Greater Lincolnshire Local Enterprise Partnership, and has led for UoL on the establishment of the Midlands Enterprise Universities Group. Andrew is also a member of the Ceres Management Committee.

Darragh Murnane

Darragh Murnane

Darragh is Associate Dean for Business and Enterprise at the University of Hertfordshire’s (UoH’s) School of Life and Medical Sciences, and also Professor of Pharmaceutics at the University’s Centre for Research in Topical Drug Delivery and Toxicology. His research work focuses on the development of aerosol medicines for inhalation therapy, which has secured significant translational investment from Innovate UK, the USA FDA, and NC3Rs among others.

Darragh leads on academic-industrial collaborations, including consultancy, knowledge transfer, research and external professional development. He has been instrumental in establishing the Hertfordshire Science Partnership and the European Regional Development Fund at UoH. Recently, Darragh has also become Principal Investigator on the INFORM 2020 EPSRC Manufacturing for the Future programme, where he is leading an international industry-academic consortium to translate drug candidates into market-ready products.

Portfolio Co-ordinators are based at each of the partner universities. They work closely with both the Ceres Team and researchers from their own universities to help identify potential agri-tech projects and then support researchers through project development, pitching to the Investment Committee and post-award.

Sue Coleman

Sue Coleman

Sue is an Intellectual Property Officer at UEA and is also part of the i-Teams coordination team; she has been involved with Ceres since 2019 as a Portfolio Co-ordinator. She has a background in both research and business and has worked in a number of roles within UEA. Her current role involves supporting academics to share their ideas with external organisations, both commercial and not-for-profit, enabling technology transfer.

Owen Lloyd

Owen Lloyd

Owen works in the Knowledge Transfer Centre facilitating collaborations between businesses and organisations interested in working with the University of Reading (UoR), identifying potential projects and supporting their development. In 2019, he became involved with Ceres as a Portfolio Co-ordinator.    

Owen is the strategic lead for Food, and also oversees UoR’s Front Door initiative, making it easier for businesses to access the University’s facilities. Owen has a background in both commercial and academic environments, giving him an ability to understand the drivers for all stakeholders in a collaboration and ensuring that projects deliver maximum value for all parties. 

Kate Green

Kate Green

Kate joined the University of Reading’s (UoR’s) Institute for Food, Nutrition and Health in June 2017, and became a Ceres Portfolio Co-ordinator for the University in 2019. In her role as Partnerships Manager she is responsible for actively identifying and developing opportunities for multi-disciplinary collaboration, both among researchers and academics across UoR, as well as with external stakeholders who share the Institute’s strategic ambitions.   

Prior to joining UoR, Kate worked as Director of Business Development at the Collab Group (a network of Further Education Colleges), where she took a strategic lead on business partnerships and had responsibility for collaborative bids and contracts. Kate has also worked extensively within the Further Education sector as a management consultant, co-ordinating a regional network of training providers and delivering bespoke support to a wide variety of organisations across the country. 

Andrew Pearson

Andrew Pearson

Andrew is the Technology Transfer manager within Enterprise & Business Development at the University of Hertfordshire, and is involved with Ceres as a Portfolio Co-ordinator.

Jessica Boot-Marshall

Jessica Boot-Marshall

Having joined the University of Lincoln (UoL) in 2016, Jess’ current role as Acting Industrial Partnerships Manager involves managing, expanding and deepening the University’s external and industrial partnerships through a broad range of mechanisms. These include technology transfer, contract and collaborative research, consultancy and grant-funded support programmes such as Innovate UK.

Jess became involved with Ceres in 2019, working as Ceres Portfolio Co-ordinator for UoL, and has successfully supported several Ceres projects on their Ceres project journey.